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How do I choose the right filling machine?

When choosing which filling machine is the right one for you, the best method is to focus on your requirements of the system and identify the ideal specifications. Some of the main things to consider are:

The viscosity. Does the liquid in question flow freely, or is it a higher viscosity? In general terms, the higher a liquid’s viscosity, the fewer filling options there are available.

Free-flowing, low viscosity liquids can often be filled by either a volumetric system which uses a pneumatically powered piston to displace a predetermined amount of liquid, or by a vacuum filling system which uses a special filling nozzle arrangement to draw liquid into the bottle by suction.

The container. The size, shape, and material a container is made from will influence the type of machine used to fill it. Most rigid plastic or glass bottle can be filled with thinner, free-flowing liquids via a vacuum-level filling machine, whilst jars, flexible bottles or pouches are likely to require a volumetric filling system. Large containers above 5-litres may require a volumetric system with a mobile ‘Wander Nozzle’ to allow the operator to fill the containers at ground level.

Fill accuracy. The level of accuracy required can also influence the choice of liquid filling system. In situations where the finished product is visible within the bottle and displayed in a retail environment, a vacuum level filling system may be appropriate because it will fill bottles to the same height, regardless of any differences from one container to another. This is particularly useful when filling glass bottles as the glass thickness can vary substantially.

Where a consistent, dependable fill volume is required and the aesthetics of several bottles displayed side-by-side on a shelf is not important, a volumetric filling system will provide a greater level of accuracy (commonly +/-0.5%). Volumetric filling systems work with a wider range of viscosities and container types.

Many of our volumetric filling machines have the added benefit of a variable, user specified ‘secondary fill volume’ which reduces the filling speed towards the end of each cycle, preventing liquid from splashing out of the top in the final stage of filling.

Production scale. The number of containers to be filled has a direct correlation with the level of automation the suitable filling system should have. Production scales of a between a few dozen and a few hundred can – in many cases – be achieved using either a manual or semi-automatic filling system, whereas regular production runs upwards of 1,000 are likely to require a greater level of automation through the filling process to achieve a high enough production rate. Semi-automatic and manual filling systems tend to be quicker to clean and changeover for a different filling application than fully automatic filling systems.

Production scales can be increased in several ways: conveyor systems to pass containers through the filling process automatically, multi-headed filling systems can fill up to 12 containers simultaneously, rotary infeed and outfeed tables can allow operators to place and remove numerous containers more rapidly. Additional systems can also be added such as capping and labelling to further increase production output.

Production environment. Manual filling machines such as our Handifill range can – for the most part – be used almost anywhere provided there is a firm surface to secure the machine to. Semi- automatic and fully automatic filling equipment will require either a supply of compressed air, electricity or both. Our liquid filling systems can be specified for use in ATEX environments.

Other considerations. Apart from the items listed above, there are a few other things to consider when choosing the right filling machine for your application. The type of liquid is a major factor. The contact parts within our filling machines are made from food- and pharmaceutical-grade 316 stainless steel.

Hoses, internal seals and valve assemblies are often specified to suit the type of liquid to be filled, whether it be Whisky or printer ink, paint or car wax; the materials used within the filling system need to be specified to suit to avoid contamination or premature seal degradation and failure. For example, piston seals which can withstand the rigours of dispensing acids may not be accredited for use within food or drinks production.

Another item influenced by the liquid type is the nozzles used. Nozzles are made to suit each application, container types and fill volume. Although often overlooked, the nozzle design can have a huge impact on the capability of a filling system to cleanly and efficiently fill containers time and again.

The characteristics of a liquid also play a part in the specification of a filling system and its nozzle design. Particularly ‘sticky’ liquids, such as syrup, may be similar viscosity to a hair gel, yet is likely to ‘cling’ to surfaces more readily than gel. Equally, printer ink can be the same viscosity as detergent but less likely to foam when dispensed. These characteristics will be addressed in the design of the nozzle in order to dispense cleanly and efficiently.

Posimatic EV Servo
Vacufill Semi-Automatic Filling Machine

How do I choose the right filling machine?

When choosing which filling machine is the right one for you, the best method is to focus on your requirements of the system and identify the specification. Some of the main things to consider are:

The viscosity. Does the liquid in question flow freely, or is it a higher viscosity? In general terms, the higher a liquid’s viscosity, the fewer filling options there are available.

Free-flowing, low viscosity liquids can often be filled by either a volumetric system which uses a pneumatically powered piston to displace a predetermined amount of liquid, or by a vacuum filling system which uses a special filling nozzle arrangement to draw liquid into the bottle by suction.

The container. The size, shape, and material a container is made from will influence the type of machine used to fill it. Most rigid plastic or glass bottle can be filled with thinner, free-flowing liquids via a vacuum-level filling machine, whilst jars, flexible bottles or pouches are likely to require a volumetric filling system. Large containers above 5-litres may require a volumetric system with a mobile ‘Wander Nozzle’ to allow the operator to fill the containers at ground level.

Fill accuracy. The level of accuracy required can also influence the choice of liquid filling system. In situations where the finished product is visible within the bottle and displayed in a retail environment, a vacuum level filling system may be appropriate because it will fill bottles to the same height, regardless of any differences from one container to another. This is particularly useful when filling glass bottles as the glass thickness can vary substantially.

Where a consistent, dependable fill volume is required and the aesthetics of several bottles displayed side-by-side on a shelf is not important, a volumetric filling system will provide a greater level of accuracy (commonly +/-0.5%). Volumetric filling systems work with a wider range of viscosities and container types.

Many of our volumetric filling machines have the added benefit of a variable, user specified ‘secondary fill volume’ which reduces the filling speed towards the end of each cycle, preventing liquid from splashing out of the top in the final stage of filling.

Production scale. The number of containers to be filled has a direct correlation with the level of automation the suitable filling system should have. Production scales of a between a few dozen and a few hundred can – in many cases – be achieved using either a manual or semi-automatic filling system, whereas regular production runs upwards of 1,000 are likely to require a greater level of automation through the filling process to achieve a high enough production rate. Semi-automatic and manual filling systems tend to be quicker to clean and changeover for a different filling application than fully automatic filling systems.

Production scales can be increased in several ways: conveyor systems to pass containers through the filling process automatically, multi-headed filling systems can fill up to 12 containers simultaneously, rotary infeed and outfeed tables can allow operators to place and remove numerous containers more rapidly. Additional systems can also be added such as capping and labelling to further increase production output.

Production environment. Manual filling machines such as our Handifill range can – for the most part – be used almost anywhere provided there is a firm surface to secure the machine to. Semi- automatic and fully automatic filling equipment will require either a supply of compressed air, electricity or both. Our liquid filling systems can be specified for use in ATEX environments.

Other considerations. Apart from the items listed above, there are a few other things to consider when choosing the right filling machine for your application. The type of liquid is a major factor. The contact parts within our filling machines are made from food- and pharmaceutical-grade 316 stainless steel.

Hoses, internal seals and valve assemblies are often specified to suit the type of liquid to be filled, whether it be Whisky or printer ink, paint or car wax; the materials used within the filling system need to be specified to suit to avoid contamination or premature seal degradation and failure. For example, piston seals which can withstand the rigours of dispensing acids may not be accredited for use within food or drinks production.

Another item influenced by the liquid type is the nozzles used. Nozzles are made to suit each application, container types and fill volume. Although often overlooked, the nozzle design can have a huge impact on the capability of a filling system to cleanly and efficiently fill containers time and again.

The characteristics of a liquid also play a part in the specification of a filling system and its nozzle design. Particularly ‘sticky’ liquids, such as syrup, may be similar viscosity to a hair gel, yet is likely to ‘cling’ to surfaces more readily than gel. Equally, printer ink can be the same viscosity as detergent but less likely to foam when dispensed. These characteristics will be addressed in the design of the nozzle in order to dispense cleanly and efficiently.

Posimatic EV Servo
Vacufill Semi-Automatic Filling Machine

How do I choose the right filling machine?

When choosing which filling machine is the right one for you, the best method is to focus on your requirements of the system and identify the idea specification. Some of the main things to consider are:

The viscosity. Does the liquid in question flow freely, or is it a higher viscosity? In general terms, the higher a liquid’s viscosity, the fewer filling options there are available.

Free-flowing, low viscosity liquids can often be filled by either a volumetric system which uses a pneumatically powered piston to displace a predetermined amount of liquid, or by a vacuum filling system which uses a special filling nozzle arrangement to draw liquid into the bottle by suction.

The container. The size, shape, and material a container is made from will influence the type of machine used to fill it. Most rigid plastic or glass bottle can be filled with thinner, free-flowing liquids via a vacuum-level filling machine, whilst jars, flexible bottles or pouches are likely to require a volumetric filling system. Large containers above 5-litres may require a volumetric system with a mobile ‘Wander Nozzle’ to allow the operator to fill the containers at ground level.

Fill accuracy. The level of accuracy required can also influence the choice of liquid filling system. In situations where the finished product is visible within the bottle and displayed in a retail environment, a vacuum level filling system may be appropriate because it will fill bottles to the same height, regardless of any differences from one container to another. This is particularly useful when filling glass bottles as the glass thickness can vary substantially.

Where a consistent, dependable fill volume is required and the aesthetics of several bottles displayed side-by-side on a shelf is not important, a volumetric filling system will provide a greater level of accuracy (commonly +/-0.5%). Volumetric filling systems work with a wider range of viscosities and container types.

Many of our volumetric filling machines have the added benefit of a variable, user specified ‘secondary fill volume’ which reduces the filling speed towards the end of each cycle, preventing liquid from splashing out of the top in the final stage of filling.

Production scale. The number of containers to be filled has a direct correlation with the level of automation the suitable filling system should have. Production scales of a between a few dozen and a few hundred can – in many cases – be achieved using either a manual or semi-automatic filling system, whereas regular production runs upwards of 1,000 are likely to require a greater level of automation through the filling process to achieve a high enough production rate. Semi-automatic and manual filling systems tend to be quicker to clean and changeover for a different filling application than fully automatic filling systems.

Production scales can be increased in several ways: conveyor systems to pass containers through the filling process automatically, multi-headed filling systems can fill up to 12 containers simultaneously, rotary infeed and outfeed tables can allow operators to place and remove numerous containers more rapidly. Additional systems can also be added such as capping and labelling to further increase production output.

Production environment. Manual filling machines such as our Handifill range can – for the most part – be used almost anywhere provided there is a firm surface to secure the machine to. Semi- automatic and fully automatic filling equipment will require either a supply of compressed air, electricity or both. Our liquid filling systems can be specified for use in ATEX environments.

Other considerations. Apart from the items listed above, there are a few other things to consider when choosing the right filling machine for your application. The type of liquid is a major factor. The contact parts within our filling machines are made from food- and pharmaceutical-grade 316 stainless steel.

Hoses, internal seals and valve assemblies are often specified to suit the type of liquid to be filled, whether it be Whisky or printer ink, paint or car wax; the materials used within the filling system need to be specified to suit to avoid contamination or premature seal degradation and failure. For example, piston seals which can withstand the rigours of dispensing acids may not be accredited for use within food or drinks production.

Another item influenced by the liquid type is the nozzles used. Nozzles are made to suit each application, container types and fill volume. Although often overlooked, the nozzle design can have a huge impact on the capability of a filling system to cleanly and efficiently fill containers time and again.

The characteristics of a liquid also play a part in the specification of a filling system and its nozzle design. Particularly ‘sticky’ liquids, such as syrup, may be similar viscosity to a hair gel, yet is likely to ‘cling’ to surfaces more readily than gel. Equally, printer ink can be the same viscosity as detergent but less likely to foam when dispensed. These characteristics will be addressed in the design of the nozzle in order to dispense cleanly and efficiently.

Posimatic EV Servo
Vacufill Semi-Automatic Filling Machine

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